Author Etiquette - Conventions, Networking and Professionalism

by Jennifer 7. June 2016 15:37

Good day readers. It’s time for another Author Etiquette. We started this little series because we love authorswe wouldn’t be in this business if we didn’t. But authors are human and sometimes make mistakes. On occasion we don’t understand and miss some fundamentals in the writing world. Whether you are a new author or a seasoned pro, we hope this column will give you some perspective on issues and help keep you out of trouble.

 

While conventions happen throughout the year, most of the cons are scheduled in the spring, summer and early fall. If you look at the calendar you can probably guess convention season is in full swing right now. Social media is alight with people sharing where they will be, what panels they will participate in and plans for cosplay costumes. It’s a great place to meet up with friends and make a lot of new ones.

 

For those who haven’t had a chance to attend a convention, let me give you just a bit of a taste of what goes on.

Conventions

Conventions come in many different genre flavors. From romance to horror, you can find a con that fits your specific tastes. Many conventions have a theme or specific genre they cater to, but some are a wonderful combination of pop culture, artists, and authors. You can find cosplayers and costume designers alongside actors and musicians. Often there are panels that range from putting together a steampunk costume, to how to approach publishers about games, art or stories. Artists sometimes offer demonstrations on their techniques. Some conventions even have gaming sessions.

 

Cons are busy places. In between panels, and demonstrations and performances, you can find groups of people talking about costumes, publishing and art. Interviews and podcasts are being conducted along with people networking for new projects.

 

If you are curious, seek out something small at first. Most cities have at least one convention during the year, some more than one. Check the websites to find out who the special guests are and what days and times the convention will be held. Then go and have a good time. Talk with the people there and make new friends, because one of the best things about conventions is the ability to network.

Networking

To the new authors out there, networking is an important skill to develop. While social media does give people the opportunity to network and work together, talking to someone face to face often has better results. Conventions give you the opportunity to talk and contribute to discussions. It allows people to put a face to the name. And it allows you to listen to what’s going on in person.

 

Networking can be very important for a few reasons. First, you may hear of a new anthology you may want to write for. You might be introduced to an agent or other publishers. You can also get a feel for the industry when you network. When people get together, they talk about their experiences. Some good. Some bad. Listening to how others handle situations can give you some insight on what is going on and perhaps a lead on where things are heading.

 

Speaking with people you have only heard of or met online can open up opportunities. You might gain contacts for freelancing work. Or hear of a new publishing company. It depends on who you talk to or happen to sit next to at the bar.

 

There are some basic rules for networking but first and foremost is be professional.

Professionalism

This should really go without saying but always be professional when you are at a convention. Sure you are there to have a good time, but you never know when an opportunity will knock at your door. By being professional you are presenting a demeanour that will make an impression and at a convention, impressions can make a difference.

 

First, always introduce yourself. An author or a publisher may not recognize you. A simple, “Hello I’m, (Insert Name) and I had a story in your (insert anthology or magazine.)”  or “Hi, I’m (Insert name) and we talked a few weeks ago on FB about (insert discussion.)” helps to jog the memory sometimes. But don’t be disappointed if they don’t remember you. Remember that authors and publishers talk to many people on social media and during a convention and it may be difficult to remember everything.

 

Don’t block the table. If you’d like to speak with a publisher, author or artist about something remember that they are there to make money. Having a booth and attending a convention is expensive. Don’t block their booth or insist they speak with you while things are busy. Stand to the side and be patient.  Ask if they have time for a cup of coffee or would like to meet up after things die down. And again, don’t be angry if they simply don’t have time for you.

 

Leave a business card. Your business card can speak volumes. First it must have your name and your contact information (email only is fine). A simple logo or photo of your work will help someone recall who you are. Also a reminder of what you do on the front helps. Words such as author, editor, publisher or publicist, helps people categorize what you do. Lastly, leave the back blank. This is so that people can write notes so that they can remember who you are and what you talked about.

 

Follow up. Hopefully you grabbed a business card or already have the contact information of the people you spoke with at a convention. A simple polite email stating that you enjoyed speaking with them, the subject of the discussion and a wish to work with them in the future works great. If the author, publisher or artist is available to speak further, they now have your information at hand. But please don’t expect an immediate response. Most publishers and authors have a lot to unpack and catch up on.

 

Conventions are a great way to expand your knowledge of the publishing world and to meet new people. Networking can lead to a lot of great projects or ideas. Being professional ensures that everyone has a great time. I encourage everyone to attend at least onemostly because I know you’ll attend more.

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Mark Ferrari and the Gemmell Nomination

by Jennifer 24. May 2016 08:29

Apocalypse Ink Productions would like to announce that the cover of The Flotsam Trilogy omnibus, created by Mark Ferrari, has appeared on the long list for a Gemmell Award in the Ravenheart category for Best Cover Art. The Gemmell Award was established to celebrate the best in fantasy fiction and art and commemorate David Gemmell. The awards will be given out on September 24th at Fantasycon.


We would like to congratulate Mark Ferrari, on his wonderful work on all of the covers in the Flotsam series. He also does the cover copy for the Cross Cutting series. Join us in congratulating Mark for this achievement.


Please take just a moment to head over to the Gemmell Awards site and vote not only for Best Cover Art, but for the Legend Award for Best Fantasy Novel, the Morningstar Award for Best Debut Fantasy novel and the Ravenheart Award.


Voting on the long list will be open until Friday June 24th. The shortlist will open for voting on Friday July 8th and close on Friday August 19th.

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THE HOLLOW has been released!

by Jennifer 17. May 2016 09:26

Apocalypse Ink Productions | Amazon
DriveThruFiction | Barnes&Noble

Ache Vetrov is clairvoyant and a caretaker of secrets and lost things.  He can draw true faces out from behind public masks and get objects to spill their stories with a touch. He’s the perfect choice to investigate a mysterious wave of violence threatening to overwhelm the city of Lafayette.

With the help of his partner and city guardian, Trinidad O’Laughlin, Ache uncovers
The Hollow. Creatures with concave faces devoid of feeling or mercy. Their motives are unclear, but all around the city, people are losing their humanity to a deadening static.

Ache, Trinidad, and their friends must hold strong if they hope to find a way to stop the monstrous invasion before it erases everything.


(Photo by Amber Clark, Stopped Motion Photograpy. Cover Design by Mark Ferrari.)

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Author Etiquette - Contracts: Why You Need Them and What to Watch For

by Jennifer 10. May 2016 08:35

Good day readers. It’s time for another Author Etiquette. We started this little series because we love authorswe wouldn’t be in this business if we didn’t. But authors are human and sometimes make mistakes or don’t understand some fundamentals in the writing world. Whether you are a new author or a seasoned pro, we hope this column will give you some perspective on issues and help keep you out of trouble.

If you’ve been in publishing long, you’ve probably heard stories about authors who have had issues with their publishers, editors or other people associated with getting books into the hands of readers. It can be as simple as a missed deadline or as complex as many thousands of dollars in lost royalties. For some, the situation is easily handled, but for others it’s an ongoing nightmare. Many of the issues do point to publishers but the issues can be on both sides of the publishing line, meaning sometimes authors are just as liable as publishers when it comes to making a mess.

So when an issue comes up who is to blame? And how does it get fixed?

The answer is in the contract.


Contracts

Any time you work with an editor, publisher, promoter or even artist, you should have a contract.  No if, ands or buts. No verbal agreementsunless it is a prelude to a contractor “gentleman’s agreements.”

Contracts are written documents that outline the duties and responsibilities of each party. In the case of publishing it should include what rights are wanted by the publisher, when the story is due to the publisher, publication date, payment, when royalty payments go out and other features. It can vary from publisher to publisher but every contract should have the same basic features.


When there’s a dispute, authors and other parties can look back at the contract and reach a resolution. That would happen if everyone lived in a fair world. But not all contracts are the same. People don’t read what’s in a contract and some publishers take advantage of authors and artists. That’s why it’s important to read it and understand what you are agreeing to.

Do Your Homework

Before you even submit to any publication do your homework.*

  • Read guidelines.

  • Ask authors affiliated with the publisher if they are happy. Listen to both the good and bad.

  • Find out rankings on Amazon and look at sales.

  • Research the company. How long have they been in business? Has there been any controversy?

  • Where can you find their books at? Conventions? Online? Bookstores?

  • Who is the publisher? How long have they been in publishing?

  • Who is their editor, publicist, art director? What are their backgrounds?


These are all good indicators of the health of a publisher. If authors are generally happy, it has decent sales, has a professional website, has been in business for a few years, and you can find their books easily, it’s a pretty good indication that the publisher
could be the real deal.


But don’t let your guard down. Some predatory publishers can disguise themselves very well.

READ IT

After you submit and get accepted you get to the next hurdle. I can’t stress this enough.


READ THE CONTRACT.


Don’t just glance at it.
Read it.


Many contracts are straightforward. An honest publisher simply wants your story so they and you can make money. But not everyone is honest. It is your job to protect yourself. Even agents can miss something, so don’t rely on everything they say.


If there’s a clause or line in the contract that you don’t understand, ask about it. Ask the publisher and ask a more experienced author. Ask two or three if you are really concerned. Maybe it’s nothing to worry about. But better to be safe than sorry.

Know the Terms

Like many legal documents, contracts can be confusing. The longer the contract, the more terms and clauses and subclauses which can lead to an author with glazed over eyes signing on the dotted line. Here are some that you need to watch for.


Rights

There are all sorts of rights in publishing. Print rights, electronic rights, English rights, Foreign language rights, video, audio, and many more can be given away with the stroke of the pen. Be sure that you are giving only the necessary rights away with the contract.


Exclusivity

When a publisher purchases rights they expect that no one else will be publishing the story in the preferred format during a reasonable amount of time. Don’t sign a contract with an open ended exclusivity.


Original work/Reprint

If you are claiming your work as original, make sure it’s not been posted to your blog, other public form that isn’t password protected or already printed elsewhere.


Byline

This is the name you want your work listed under. Publishers should be aware if you are using a pseudonym. (just for legal purposes such as earning reports)


Publication date

The expected publication date of the work should be in the contract. This gives you and the publisher an idea of when the story will be available for viewing. It also starts the countdown as to when the exclusive printing rights will be released. (yes this can be revised if things go wrong but still read the amendments carefully.)


Termination/Breach of Agreement

These clauses will outline what and how to proceed when things go wrong. Depending on who is at fault, it could result in a return of prior payment or having rights reverted back to the author.


Non-Compete clauses

This one can be tricky. Some publishers put in a non-compete clause so that they can have first look at new works. While this might seem like a good thing, some contracts bind an author to ONLY working with this publisher. In other words, once the contract is signed, an author cannot work with other publishers until the contract expires.


Payment

A contract should outline how an author gets paid, how much and when. It should include how often royalty payments should be received--if that applies.

Ask for Changes

If any clauses of a contract make you nervous, ask for changes. A contract, even with a large publisher, shouldn’t be set in stone. A few changes here and there to accommodate both parties can make a business relationship run much smoother. Outline your concerns and suggest changes. Publishers can resist, but if you have good reasons then it shouldn’t be an issue.


However, when there are several clauses in a contract that do not favor authors and the publisher declines to make changes, it’s probably best to walk away. Better to search out other publishers or even self publish rather than be locked into a contract that takes away your rights as an author for years down the line.


It’s easy to fall into the desperation trap and look for anyone to publish your work. Predatory publishers trap the unwary and desperate. Clueless publishers trap authors into bad contracts even though they have good intentions. Vanity publishers talk up their products often asking for money upfront for things like editing, book covers and promotion. It’s up to you to make informed decisions about where and how you publish.


Read your contracts carefully. Know what is being asked for. Do your homework. Ask for changes but be prepared to walk away if you aren’t positive this is a good decision. It’s up to you to make the best decision possible for your work.

 

 

*You can find a lot of great information on contracts, publishers and complaints at Writer Beware.

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THE HOLLOW Cover Reveal

by Jennifer 20. April 2016 09:20

THE HOLLOW, book 2 of the Cross Cutting trilogy by Wendy Hammer, will be released on 17 May 2016.

Ache Vetrov is clairvoyant and a caretaker of secrets and lost things.  He can draw true faces out from behind public masks and get objects to spill their stories with a touch. He’s the perfect choice to investigate a mysterious wave of violence threatening to overwhelm the city of Lafayette.

With the help of his partner and city guardian, Trinidad O’Laughlin, Ache uncovers
The Hollow. Creatures with concave faces devoid of feeling or mercy. Their motives are unclear, but all around the city, people are losing their humanity to a deadening static.

Ache, Trinidad, and their friends must hold strong if they hope to find a way to stop the monstrous invasion before it erases everything.

(Photo by Amber Clark, Stopped Motion Photograpy. Cover Design by Mark Ferrari.)

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Author Etiquette: The Editor is Your Story’s Best Friend

by Jennifer 5. April 2016 20:43

Welcome back to Author Etiquette. We started this little series because we love authors--we wouldn’t be in this business if we didn’t. But authors are human and sometimes make mistakes or don’t understand some fundamentals in the writing world. Whether you are a new author or a seasoned pro, we hope this column will give you some perspective on issues and help keep you out of trouble.

 

Writers write stories. That’s their job. They take little pieces of this and that and mix it together and somehow come up with stuff that other people like to read. There’s a lot of different processes that stories go through from beginning to end but one of those steps should at some point include an editor.

 

To some people, an editor is normal part of the writing process, but to others having an editor look at your work seems like an unnecessary step. To listen to some authors, editors are scary beasts that tear up your precious manuscript. They don’t understand how unique and special your work is. Plus, they cost money. Those who feel this way seem to think that beta readers and self editing is good enough.

 

Sorry, but no.

 

Misconceptions


There’s some misconceptions about editors especially among new writers. Whispered rumors about stolen ideas and stories have always existed. Horror stories of editors that flay stories, and authors, drift around. The words “harsh but fair” is often met with skepticism. It’s understandable that some people, especially those who are new or are uninformed, see editors as unnecessary or even the enemy.


Editors aren’t the enemy in fact, they are your story’s best friend.


They aren’t going to steal your ideas or your story, but they will tell you the truth. Isn’t that what a best friend does? They will tell you what parts of your story works and what doesn’t... in order to help you. They will spend hours reading and commenting and searching out links to help you. They want you to succeed. They are there to support you and point you to the tools that will make you a better writer.


Why You Need an Editor


When you are writing, there are blind spots that your own mind glosses over. You don’t see those information gaps or plot holes. Passive voice sneaks into chapters. Character or location names get mixed up. Pacing can drift and lose ends can trip up even the most devoted reader. Overall, your story might drift around aimlessly. The characters might not follow a definite arc. Even if you’ve read your story several times, you aren’t going to catch all of them. You might never even know those issues exist. That’s why you need an editor.


An editor’s job is to refine a story so that it’s the best it can be. What some authors don’t realize is they are too close to the story and often can’t see certain issues. This could be because the author knows all of the backstory, or knows something that happens off scene that’s important later. Sometimes, it’s habits that the author hasn’t broken yet, like overusing adverbs. These and many other issues are the kinds of things an editor will look for. They want your story to be better.


But sending your story or novel to an editor is scary. Even I admit that. While you are waiting there’s a lot of anxiousness that builds up. Then when you get that email back, it’s just as nerve wracking and often disappointing.


Sometimes hearing the truth hurts. You’ve worked hard on creating a world, characters and a story line. You have done the best you can to put all of your ideas on paper. To hear that it’s not working and things need to be torn apart can be devastating.


Your Story’s Best Friend


There’s lots of places where your work will cross an editor’s path. When you submit short stories to publications, if your story is accepted, an editor will look at it and make suggestions. Agents submit novels to editors at publishing houses. And again, if it’s accepted, you will receive your manuscript back with lots of red marks. At a convention, you might strike up a conversation with an editor or two. Online, in forums, and in everyday life, you can find editors. They are normal people with a particular set of skills that is valuable in the publishing world.


There are lots of ways to become an editor. Some people have college degrees in English or Literature. Others have spent a great deal of time reading, but have always loved the structure and flow of words on the page. A few have started at different areas in publishing and have gradually worked their way up from being a slush reader or a reviewer.  The ways of becoming an editor is as varied as the ways of becoming an author.


While there are editors all over, you might not work well with everyone. When you submit to a publication, you don’t have a choice on who you work with. But if you self publish, you have plenty of choices. One thing to remember is, an editor doesn’t work for free.


You Get What You Pay For


If you look on writing forums or writing groups, there are many people offering to edit your work for either free or for a very low cost. Some of these could be fresh out of college professionals needing some experience, but sometimes it’s just someone wanting a quick buck. Often these lowball offers result in poor quality work that doesn’t help you improve as a writer.


As you go up the ladder, you find more experienced editors. Ones who have had several years honing their craft. Some charge a flat fee for working on your story while others charge by the hour. The best known editors charge a hefty fee, but again, they are the best in their field.


When looking for an editor, look at your budget, look at the credentials of those in your price range. Pick the one you think you can work with. Many times, you can ask for a chapter review, so that both of you can gauge what kind of editing you will need. This gives you and the editor an idea of what to expect.


For the Love of Stories

What would our world look like without editors? Remember the very first story you wrote? Have you pulled it out lately? Do you remember cringing?

Without editors, most of what we read would look similar to those stories. Sure there’s some authors out there that write cleanly and have very few errors. But for the most part, everyone needs an editor. Whether you use one in the developmental stage, content stage or line edits, is up to you.

Just remember, while some of their comments might hurt or make you angry, an editor is there to help you make your story the best it can be.

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Karen Wilson Chronicles Trade Paperback Last Chance Sale

by Jennifer 29. March 2016 08:43

SALE!

Karen Wilson Chronicles
Trade Paperback Bundle

March 29th until May 1st

All four Karen Wilson Chronicles
trade paperback books.

Just $30.00

Add to Cart

Apocalypse Ink Productions is now up to 19 different titles. That’s not too bad for a small publishing company in 4 years. But there’s one little problem.

 

Those books take up a lot of space, not only for storage but on our convention tables as well. We want you to see all of our wonderful booksthere’s some amazing artwork on the coversbut with new titles coming soon, things are getting just a little crowded.

 

So, from 29 March until 1 May, AIP is going to be phasing out the physical copies* of the four Karen Wilson Chronicles novels. Now that we have the Karen Wilson Chronicles Omnibus, there’s little need to keep all of the individual novels on hand at all times. What this means for you, is you have a great opportunity to grab the following titles: Caller Unknown, Children of Anu, Keystones and Chimera Incarnate at a great price from our store.

 

This sale lasts until May 1st, so hurry and grab your copies now, while supplies last.  

http://www.apocalypse-ink.com/


*These books will still be available in individual ebook formats, but when the individual trade paperbacks are gone from our physical store, they are gone.

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The Karen Wilson Chronicles Omnibus is Released!

by Jennifer 22. March 2016 09:07

Apocalypse Ink Productions | Amazon
DriveThruFiction | Barnes&Noble
Note: The hardback signed limited edition of this book is only available on the AIP website.

THE KAREN WILSON CHRONICLES OMNIBUS
Karen Wilson is a 911 operator in the city of Kendrick, who receives a very strange phone call and discovers that her city is not at all what it appears to be. Pulled into Kendrick’s hidden, supernatural world, she finds herself appointed as the mysterious Master of the City’s visible representative to—well, everyone—and then gets adopted by a baby gargoyle. Can things get any stranger?

In Kendrick, they probably can.

Join Karen and her allies as they fight to protect not just themselves, but the entire city and its denizens, from dangers within that threaten to consume them whole.


This omnibus contains all four of the Karen Wilson Chronicles novels (Caller Unknown, Children of Anu, Keystones, Chimera Incarnate) as well as bonus content including a never before published short story, “The Fool’s Path.”

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The Karen Wilscon Chronicles LE Omnibus

by Jennifer 16. March 2016 08:39

The Karen Wilson Chronicles omnibus ebook verison has popped up on Amazon for pre-order. It's going to be awesome.

Even more awesome, the limited edition, signed, hardback version of Karen Wilson Chronicles omnibus has arrived at Apocalypse Ink Productions and will be available at Norwescon! I love our LE editions.

They are so pretty.

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Author Etiquette: Follow the Instructions

by Jennifer 9. March 2016 09:09

Congratulations!

We see you’ve just written a novel, a short story, or flash fiction. We know you are eager to find a home for your work, you’ve looked at markets and found us.

While we are honored to have you submit to us, please do your homework and follow the instructions listed on our submission page. Please note: our submission guidelines are not optional fields.

1. We want to see your best work. While a few writers can write cleanly enough to submit a first draft, most writers really should set a manuscript aside at least for a few days (while working on something else) and then edit it. If you have beta readers, please seek their assistance in refining your work. Read the story out loud and look for misused or missing words. Check for plot pacing, flat characters and continuity errors. Take the time to create the best story you can. Sure, it might mean missing a submission window, but it might make enough of a difference between an A or and R later on.

2. Please check the dates on the submission window. Not all publishers are open to submissions year round. Sure your story might be a perfect fit, but if we aren’t open, your submission will be deleted unread. The only reason you should ever submit outside of the window is because you have permission from someone in that publishing company. If so, then in the cover letter, you should state details of why you are submitting outside of the regular window, who you spoke with and where.

3. A properly formatted manuscript is like looking at someone who is dressed appropriately for an important meeting. The slush readers and editors can’t look at you face to face, but they can look directly at your work. Formatting your manuscript in the style a publisher wants gives them an indication of how you work with instruction. While some publishers require specific formatting most use the William Shunn method. Free advice: Learn to format every manuscript this way. It will save you many headaches later.

4. We do not want fancy fonts. First of all they are distracting and difficult to read. Second, they may not show up properly on our computers. Generally, Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier in a 12 point type are best. If we need to you to format in another font, we will have instructions on what one to use. Use of other fonts such as Papyrus, Curlz, or Comic Sans MS will result in rejections. Also, trying to use a tiny font to conserve paper is commendable, but with electronic submissions not necessary. Double also, use only a black font on a white background. Anything else kills our eyes and will kill your chances at publication.

5. Please, for the love of Pete, use paragraphs. Because our readers and editors enjoy reading and not having headaches, big blocks of texts is not preferred. A page full of text where there’s no relief is very intimidating to many people, and when a writer doesn’t use paragraphs, the lines tend to blur causing eye strain and stress. Break things down some. When there’s a new thought, or if someone else is doing something, start a new paragraph. Don’t worry the reader will not get lost.

6. Read the guidelines as to what type of spacing the publication requires. A publisher might request double or even triple spacing of a manuscript. Conversely, they might not want that extra space at all. Some want a double return after a paragraph. If a publisher does not specify, use of the Shunn manuscript format is always appreciated.

7. In some cases such as flash or micro fiction, headers and footers are not necessary, but for most manuscripts it’s pretty useful in determining if a manuscript is yours and to have an area where your pages are numbered. This is really important when an editor or publisher has a pile of manuscripts on their desk and the cat decides to teleport suddenly in the middle of it. If your manuscript is numbered and identified, it’s much easier to put it all back together. Please read the guidelines as to if the publisher wants headers and or footers on the submission.

8. Now we come to the final pieces of a submission. Your cover letter should be less than a page long. For novels, a synopsis may be required but for most short stories, please leave it off. We also do not need to hear your life story--interesting as it may be. Two hundred words (or less) that say a little about you is fine. We also do not need your entire list of publishing credentials. Your most recent or most important three are just fine. If you have a tiny bit of information relevant to the story or publisher you may add that too but please be very brief.

9. This last step is very important. Take notes if necessary. Make sure you attach the right file to the submission. If you’ve taken the time to properly format your work, go ahead and save it as a separate file with your last name, title and market. This way you’ve got the right file going to the right place. You’d be surprised how many submission are received without a story or how many emails have been received stating that they sent the wrong file.

So if you feel as though you can follow these steps, we welcome you to submit your work to any publication we are in charge of. While we love the variations in stories, having guidelines helps us read and critique the work we receive. We want to give everyone a fair chance so here’s your sign.

Follow the Instructions.
PLEASE!


Signed,
Slush readers, Editors and Publishers

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