Interview with Ivan Ewert

by Jennifer 9. August 2017 09:18

Interview with Ivan Ewert, author of Famished: The Gentlemen Ghouls Omnibus. Pre-order here.

Ivan Ewert was born in Chicago, Illinois, and has never wandered far afield. He has deep roots in the American Midwest, finding a sense of both belonging and terror within the endless surburban labyrinths, deep north woods, tangled city streets and boundless prairie skies. The land and the cycles of the year both speak to him and inform his writing; which revolves around the strange, the beautiful, the delicious and the unseen.

How did it feel to finish up the series finally?
To be honest, it was an unbelievable relief. Finishing every book gave me a little shot of joy, but the series as a whole was like removing a ton of bricks from my shoulders. As you mention below, some of the story elements weren’t very pleasant to dwell on – and I carried them around in my head for over ten years. My procrastination and masochism seemed to enjoy joining forces for this process.

Of course, relief’s not the only feeling, and the project was worth its weight to me. I was very proud of finishing three novels and several short stories. While there are more writers today than ever before in our history, many of whom are far more prolific than I, it still felt like a great accomplishment. My father had encouraged me to get something printed on the way to his deathbed, so there’s a great deal of emotion tied up with that as well.

The one thing I’ll certainly miss is an excuse to work directly with Apocalypse Ink Productions. Nothing I’ve done would have seen the light of day without their encouragement, professionalism, and understanding.

 

Where did Gordon and the Ghouls come from? (Inspiration)
Gordon’s got a lot of me in him. Probably more than was wise, but I started this series when I was young and (more) foolish. I wanted my protagonist to suffer from self-doubt, especially after he unknowingly takes part in such a terrible act, rather than the kind of cocky swagger so many of my protagonists have manifested. Making him Catholic let me reflect that great snowballing guilt – from one sin to another, and with little means of confessing to anyone who would listen after all he has done.

The origin of the Ghouls themselves is in the little towns that dot the Illinois prairie. Towns like Mahomet, Lick Creek, Kinmundy... all these tiny places that seem wrapped up in something older and more terrible than a rail stop, a bar and a lone crossroads. I pass through them driving south to Georgia, or west to the Quad Cities, and I can’t help but cast them with terrible secrets.

On top of that, there’s my sense that America has been devouring itself for centuries. The constant, rapacious hunger of the American character turns itself inward and perverts its original drive. Making the Ghouls some of the first inhabitants let me play with that idea.

 

How did you choose your settings?
Google Maps. I mean, I started in Madison, Wisconsin because I’m very familiar with it and its surroundings; but after than I had to locate places that were far enough off the grid that a group like the Ghouls could actually function without too many questions being asked by neighbors.

You would not believe the trouble I went to in The Commons to find Carol’s house. I’ve still got it pinned to my personal maps, with notes on where the cul-de-sacs end, which forests are where, the location of fast food establishments. It’s a really remarkable tool, though it’s no substitute for actually being there.

In terms of broad geographical settings, I only intended to tell the story of The Farm at first, in the region I’ve lived all my life, the one I know best. When I was asked to expand New England, the South and the West were the most obvious divisions across America, the different tribes at war. Moreso now than before, but regardless.

 

What's your writing process?
It’s what you’d call scattershot. I don’t (yet) have a standard time of day to sit down to write or revise – so I write when I have some time to myself, and plenty of time in the day. Solitude is important, I’m not a coffeehouse writer, partly because I know too many people in town. Every time I’ve tried it, I run into a friend, and writing time turns into catching up. Which is lovely, in its way, but not conducive to finished product. By the same token, when my family’s in the house, I feel like I should be present for them rather than sequestering myself in a writing den. So it’s mostly early mornings or evenings after dinner when everyone has a movie to watch.

I typically turn on music and attack the next chapter in order of appearance. I can’t write jumping from chapter to chapter or scene to scene, things get too chaotic and the connecting scenes take much more work to re-write if I don’t get them down organically. Sometimes something in the future will come to me, and in that case I try to write it down and stick it in a different file, then paste it in for edits later. For the most part, though, it’s always 1-2-3-4-etc.

I’ve become a planner rather than a pantser. I want to know what needs to happen in every chapter before I sit down to write them, to construct at least a skeleton. In short fiction that’s less true – I’m happy to be surprised in those cases – but for long form novels I need to know.

 

How did you handle revisions?
I print out the entire work and read it through, line by line, usually tracing it with a red pen. I’ll mark the document up that way, then fix the work in the computer. That’s mostly just for typos and minor edits.

After that I print up a second copy which I read, aloud, on my own. That lets me catch any awkward dialogue, runs of my beloved alliteration or too much poetry in the prose for this work’s taste. While I’m doing that I will mark up areas that need to be stronger, sharper, or entirely rewritten. Then it’s back to the computer to do that work.

After that it goes to beta readers. I immediately fix any additional typos or grammatical issues, and file away any comments on things they don’t understand or disagree with. Once everyone’s comments are in, I look for common threads and attack those first, then go through individual commentary to see if I understand or agree with their issues.

After all of that is set, it’s off to Apocalypse Ink’s editor for the final go-round. I’ve been fortunate in that most revisions at that stage have been relatively minor, and relatively agreeable to me.

 

You didn't flinch at some of the story elements, how did that make you feel?
The technical term is “squicky.” The final scenes of the trilogy were very, very difficult to write and keep my head on straight – not to mention keeping my appetite. Gordon’s experience in the Pen, his solitary anguish in the north woods, the perimeter around Carol’s house, probably more. All of these were difficult to push through, and required me to recognize the darkness I carry around. I work hard to repress that darkness in my everyday life, so in some ways, fiction is a nice release valve. On the other hand, I’ve kept myself up nights after writing some scenes.

It’s a curious thing, writing horror, when you identify more with the innocent victims than the “interesting” killers. I’ve always felt more pity for those in trouble than excitement around their plight. I never had the fascination some do with serial killers or mass murder. I’ve never watched Dexter, Hannibal... I’ve never even watched Silence of the Lambs, which seems strange when I say it aloud, but it’s the truth. I’m not a fan of watching horror. I enjoy reading it, but seeing it visually creates more of an issue for me; and when I write I have to see the images in my mind. So it causes a certain amount of queasiness.

 

Do you think there are more Gordon stories out there?
I know there’s at least one: The Chainfields lay in the Southeast, the final bastion of the Gentleman Ghouls.

However, I’ve grown a great deal since initially coming up with that concept and that name, and I’m now keenly aware that I am not the person to tell that story. Even if I were, it’s a story that hardly needs to be retold and recast, particularly at this stage of history.

While my wife and her family are from the region, I’ve got no ties to it aside from them. My family has always been north of the Mason-Dixon line, and as such we only have the ties to slavery that all Americans everywhere must carry. It’s not something I can expunge with a horror novel, and I’m not about to try anytime soon.

 

What's next?
I’m working on a young adult urban fantasy which should be lighter in tone than Famished: The Gentleman Ghouls. One of the neighborhood kids has been asking why he can’t read my stuff, so I promised him something he’d be able to read. It would be nice to have something my wife and mother could read as well!

Aside from that, I’m also working on monologues to be delivered live. I’ve performed in a number of one-man shows and truly enjoyed them, and would really love to be able to present my own work onstage one day. So I’m studying people like Spaulding Grey and Mike Daisey, working to see how they transformed their own experiences into spoken word. Of course, they’ve had more interesting lives. No matter. Just means I have to work at spicing things up a bit.

 

 

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Famished: The Gentlemen Ghouls Cover Reveal and Pre-Order Link

by Jennifer 12. July 2017 09:38

Famished: The Gentlemen Ghouls by Ivan Ewert will be released on 15 August 2017.

Pre-order on Amazon.


Hunger.
It’s the driving force behind survival.


The Velander bloodline carries an ancient secret: power and immortality. But that power requires a key to unlock: human flesh. Gordon Velander finds himself an unwilling participant in a play for survival - but he won’t be powerless for long.


It’s the driving force behind passion.


The Gentleman Ghouls have survived for centuries due to cunning and careful planning but their world in unraveling. Gordon has vowed to take the Ghouls down no matter what, but he’s fighting a war—both within and without. The Ghouls, on the other hand, are not waiting patiently for the end to come.


It’s the driving force behind revenge.


With the Farm and the Commons destroyed, the Ranch is the last outpost of the Ghouls. With the bitter end in sight, Gordon must face his greatest challenge yet—claiming his own fate as other forces make their moves.


Revenge is sweet.
Passion is fulfilling.
But survival trump all.


This rural horror omnibus of cannibals, dark pacts, and ancient power by Ivan Ewert contains three novels: Famished: The Farm, Famished: The Commons, and Famished: The Ranch, and features two new short stories.

 

 

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Praise for the Gentlemen Ghouls series by Ivan Ewert

by Jennifer 16. August 2016 08:28

Gentleman Ghouls
"Ivan Ewert inks in the people and the isolation in this rural horror so darkly and so well that you'll never complain about traffic or strip malls ever again." - Kenneth Hite, TOUR DE LOVECRAFT

Famished: The Farm
"It's a horror book that is well written, has a story line, and characters that are much more than "Next Victim" or "Guy with Spooky Mask." A shocker with all of the "Saw"-like movies, stories, and books out there. The cheap shock, the cheap scare ... that's what's big. But if you like horror that is actually well written and a good read? Here's your book." - Daniel Glovier

"Ivan Ewert's FAMISHED: THE FARM is some fun, old-school horror.  Ancient gods, cannibalism, and more than a little madness.  Ivan Ewert is a seriously twisted writer." - Stephen Blackmoore, DEAD THINGS

Famished: The Commons
"This story is phenomenal. I could not put it down. This book is horror mixed with adventure, with a great cast of characters along for the ride. Linh is my favorite - smart and tough with a functioning brain in her head. She reminds me of Rose Daniels from Rose Madder, one of my favorite novels. You won't stop cheering for her and Gordon. If you love creepy, smart horror that just begs you to sleep with the lights on and trust no one, read Famished: The Commons. You won't be disappointed!" - Blanche Devereaux

 

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FAMISHED: THE RANCH Has been released!

by Jennifer 15. August 2016 08:44

Apocalypse Ink Productions | Amazon
DriveThruFiction | Barnes&Noble


Destiny, manifested.

Having defeated the Gentleman Ghouls of the Farm and the Commons, Gordon Velander—and his attendant spirits, Orobias and Sylvie—head west. They seek to destroy the most remote branch of the cannibal cult that founded America and gnaws at the roots of the free world.

However, Gordon now fights a battle both within and without. His contentious allies first struggle, then revolt, following their own agendas. At the same time, Rancher Dylan Wildye has chosen a new tactic to preserve the family bloodline.

Warring for mastery of his own body, mind, and soul, Gordon must choose not only sides, but also his fate.

Famished: The Ranch is the third and final book in the Gentleman Ghouls series from Ivan Ewert and Apocalypse Ink Productions.

 

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FAMISHED: THE RANCH Cover Reveal

by Jennifer 12. August 2016 11:10

FAMISHED: THE RANCH, book 3 of the Gentlemen Ghouls trilogy by Ivan Ewert, will be released on 15 August 2016.

Destiny, manifested.

Having defeated the Gentleman Ghouls of the Farm and the Commons, Gordon Velander—and his attendant spirits, Orobias and Sylvie—head west. They seek to destroy the most remote branch of the cannibal cult that founded America and gnaws at the roots of the free world.


However, Gordon now fights a battle both within and without. His contentious allies first struggle, then revolt, following their own agendas. At the same time, Rancher Dylan Wildye has chosen a new tactic to preserve the family bloodline.

Warring for mastery of his own body, mind, and soul, Gordon must choose not only sides, but also his fate.

Famished: The Ranch is the third and final book in the Gentleman Ghouls series from Ivan Ewert and Apocalypse Ink Productions.

FAMISHED: THE COMMONS is now $2.99!

(Photo by Amber Clark, Stopped Motion Photograpy.)

 

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2015 Yearly Roundup

by Jennifer 16. December 2015 08:56

It’s that time of year. The holidays are upon us and it’s the final rush of family get togethers, office holiday parties, and gatherings of friends. We wish you the very happiest of holidays.

 

With the year about to end, it’s also time to look back and reflect on everything we’ve accomplished this year.

 

We think 2015 has been a pretty good one. Apocalypse Ink Productions released several titles, many concluding series that were started over the past few years.

 

The Torn Soul - Sheynan Trilogy #3 by Dylan Birtolo

Chimera Incarnate - the 4th book in the Karen Wilson Chronicles by Jennifer Brozek

Crusade - the final book in the Flotsam trilogy by Peter M Ball

A new series, Cross Cutting by Wendy Hammer, began this year with The Thin.

 

We also put together two omnibus together for the Sheynan and Flotsam series. These contain not only the novels but all of the short stories related to these trilogies. They are only available on the AIP website or at conventions.

 

If you’ve not checked out any of these titles we encourage you to visit our store. There’s more dark fantasy worlds that contain shapeshifters, gargoyles and dark magic on the coast of Australia for you to explore.

 

And next year we have more. We are excited to announce more releases including:

The Karen Wilson Chronicles Omnibus

The Hollowbook #2 of The Cross Cutting series

Famished: The RanchBook 3 of the Gentleman Ghouls series by Ivan Evert

The MarrowBook #3 of the Cross Cutting Series

FamishedThe Gentleman Ghouls omnibus series

We look forward to bringing you more dark fiction titles in the future. Sign up for our monthly newsletter to hear announcements, news and keep up with our authors.

Thank you for all of your support and happy holidays!
The AIP Team

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AIP Holiday Gift Exchange

by Jennifer 12. January 2015 11:27

Apocalypse Ink Productions decided to do something just a bit different this year for the holidays.  Instead of exchanging gifts among our authors, we decided to have the main characters of our series exchange gifts. Now I know it’s a bit after the holidays, but you do have to remember some of these characters are on the run or are difficult to contact so their responses are a bit delayed. (Plus the Shadow Minion was sick.)

 

Trinidad received a gift from Karen Wilson.

It was just a brown cardboard box—perfectly ordinary except for one key detail. It was addressed to her. Trinidad had never received an unexpected package before. Pre-arranged drops and trails of dead letters were more her style, in truth. Karen had gone above and beyond.

 

“Brilliant, gyal.”

 

Trinidad grinned, pulled out her knife, and sliced through the tape. The box sprang open. The first item was a jar of lotion—something she could always use. Winter was particularly hard on her skin. Freezing wind and dry heat seemed to conspire against her. She tried a dab of the cream. “Lovely.”

 

The rest of the box was filled with arm warmers. Trinidad chose a pair with black and turquoise stripes and slipped them on. They’d keep her toasty and her fingers would still be free. Pretty and practical was a winning combination.

 

Trinidad grabbed her coat and the remaining knit sleeves. She only needed one pair, after all. The city would help her find others out in the cold. It would be a fine thing to pass along the joy of a surprise gift and she figured Karen would approve.

 

Her steps were light as she headed out for what would surely be one of the best walks of the season.

 

Darien received a gift from Trinadad.

Darien went to the door shortly after the knock, opening it just in time to see the UPS man leaving. He offered out a shout of “Thanks!”, to which the driver waved over his head without turning around to look back. Darien wasn’t surprised – he couldn’t imagine just how many deliveries the man had to take care of today. He wondered, did UPS hire extra drivers for this time of year, or did they just make their current drivers work longer hours and hopefully get paid overtime? He shrugged and picked up the box, carrying it back into the kitchen.

 

Putting the box down on the table, he looked at the return address on it, curious who knew that Susan and he were staying here. They had tried to keep their location a secret, only telling a few choice people they could trust. The name on the return label read Trinidad O’Laughlin, and he snapped his fingers in recognition. Susan had reached out to Trinidad after meeting up with her online discussing supernatural forces. She was insistent that Trinidad was someone they could trust, and Darien trusted her instincts. Although, why was Trinidad sending him a package?

Darien grabbed a knife from the butcher’s block and sliced through the tape. It was a few days after Christmas anyways, so there was nothing to wait for. Inside was a note that simply read “I had a feeling you would need these.”

 

The first item that he pulled out was a five pound bag of trail mix. It was labeled as high octane energy mix, and that title made him smile. If there was any way to describe his life after realizing what he was, it was definitely high octane and energetic. Hell, he barely was able to manage keeping track of his life himself, and he was the one living it. This would be immensely helpful if they needed to go on the run again. For weeks, this type of food was all that he, Susan, and Richard had survived on. Considering that he was getting that itch again that it might be time to run, this was quite serendipitous. Did Trinidad know more than she let on?

 

The second item in the box looked like a key. It confused him at first until he turned the package over to read the back of it. According to the description, it was a multi tool disguised as a key that could be used as a screwdriver or a knife. Given that it would fit easily onto his key ring and not be as obvious as a Swiss Army knife, this could come in handy. Even if it was small, you could never underestimate the value of having a knife on you at all times.

 

He’d need to send a thank you to Trinidad for her gifts, or ask Susan to send her a quick message. But he still couldn’t help but get the feeling that these gifts were not just for the season. Something in the back of his mind told him that they were an indicator of things to come. Perhaps he should get back to work on that escape plan, just in case it was necessary.

 

Gordon received a gift from Darien.

This is fantastic, Darien - it's got a wonderful heft to it. Edge is nice and sharp. I wish I could say it wouldn't come in handy, but I have a feeling you got me just what I'm going to need on the trek West.

 

As to friends, well ... I'm full of them. ::smiles:: But he'll make a great addition. Happy holidays and best wishes to you and yours for a wonderful New Year!

 

Karen received a gift from Gordon.

The package arrived at the Kendrick’s Historical Library instead of to Karen’s home. That, in and of itself, was unusual. Then, it was from Gordon. She shook her head. With all that was going on with him, it was amazing that he feel the need to send out gifts this year. Then again, little things. And with her casual acceptance of his personal brand of weirdness, she supposed he’d appreciate that.

 

She read the note attached before she opened the package.

 

Hello Karen - Happy New Year!

 

I apologize for the lateness of this package. We were hitching through Kansas around the holiday proper, and you wouldn't believe how long it can take to get to a FedEx.

 

I know you're a wired person, but with your new work in the library and the number of people you seem to keep track of, I thought this might be a helpful accessory. Consider it a low-tech backup for a busy lifestyle ... Kate Spade's still a thing, I hope?

With that, she ripped into the brown paper and saw Gordon’s thoughtful gift. Karen grinned at the notebook. “Well, I did just say that I needed to chronicle my adventures for the library. This is a perfect way to start.”

 

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2014 was a good year

by Jennifer 1. January 2015 08:55

2014 was a good year. We published 4 novels and 2 novellas.


Also, we acquired the Cross Cutting trilogy by Wendy Hammer.

In 2015, we plan to publish:

  • The Torn Soul, Sheynan #3.
  • Chimera Incarnate, Karen Wilson Chronicles #4.
  • Crusade, Flotsam #3.
  • Famished: The Ranch, Gentlemen Ghouls #3
  • The Thin, Cross Cutting #1.

Not a bad plan, eh?

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Interview with Ivan Ewert

by Jennifer 8. April 2014 09:36

Ivan Ewert is the author of Famished: The Farm. Its sequel, Famished: The Commons, is going through the editorial process right now.

--
What drew you to Speculative Fiction?

Ha, I just did a blog post about this! My father was a huge speculative fiction fan. His library was the thing I coveted most in my young life. When I started reading, I was actually more interested in legends like King Arthur, Robin Hood, and such – things that Disney probably turned me onto initially – but the trappings of fantasy were there.

Therefore, as I was reading, dad would suggest things I might enjoy. In third grade, I think, there was a confluence – my mother was teaching (voluntary) art classes to grade school kids, and she brought in the Brothers Hildebrandt, where I learned about The Hobbit. That was it. Done. Fantasy all the way.

Lovecraft was my introduction into horror, straight out of dad's library. He also had a lot of originals from Van Vogt, Asimov, and such, but he preferred hard science fiction, which I just don't find interesting. When I found social science fiction, I got more into it.


Was there a reason you started writing?


I drove my mother nuts with "Let's pretend" as soon as I was old enough to communicate. She humored me, though there was the occasional "Let's pretend you're Ivan, a human boy, and I'm his mother, okay?" I loved make-believe so much more than reality. (Let us leave that in past tense for the moment …)

So again, in grade school, I sat down and wrote a play at some point for my friends at school. I remember a cuckoo clock, living toys, and a lost girl. Not much else. Everyone loved it, though, and I was hooked on both the creative aspect and the attention it garnered.

Role-playing games distracted me for a long time, and didn't write much in high school – I was making stories but not having to work at writing them down. After college, I took it more seriously.


Where do you get your ideas?

Do you know I think you're the first one to ask? Ideas have always come to me most easily when moving through the darkness – driving before dawn, flying through the night. Moving silently, alert for danger, other travelers, and story fragments.


What's your current writing process? Outliner/Pantser, when, do you play music? pen/paper or keyboard/ink? any rituals? Etc.

AIP turned me into an outliner. Once I have the outline done, I carve time in my daily calendar, aiming for a minimum of one hour (usually my lunch hour at work).

When that time hits, I turn off my email notifications, my telephone, and any instant message programs. I work in Microsoft Word, though I just bought a new laptop and plan to give Scrivener a whirl. I don't like writing by hand as much. That distracts me.

Music is key. KEY. For horror and science fiction work, I'll usually go to bandcamp.com and search tags for ambient, downtempo electronica, or doomjazz. Fantasy is either Azam Ali Radio on Pandora.com or Darkfolk Radio on Last.fm.

Then, I just write until the time I allotted is up.

I don't have any real rituals. I do give a short "thank you" every morning to whatever's given me all the good in my life, which includes an imagination and the ability to convey it.


How did you get started with AIP?

I met Jennifer Brozek online through Livejournal; I think it was a friend-of-a-friend thing. I had a lot more spare time at that stage in my life, and I posted little snippets of tales and writing exercises online. We became friends online, then met up at a convention and – to my mind, anyway – became friends in real life.

When she founded The Edge of Propinquity, she asked me to contribute; and I can't tell you how happy that made me. I really enjoyed the work, and the discipline it required. Not that I was perfect. At all. I did enjoy it, though; and I'm beyond flattered that AIP continues to believe in me and work with me. They are wonderful, wonderful people whom I love very much.
 

Talk some about the Gentleman Ghouls series.

The Lovecraft short story, "The Picture in the House," which scared me sleepless, inspired the main subject matter. I wanted to examine the way that closed, insular societies work. Cults and secret societies have always fascinated me, as has the American experience as a whole, which I hope will come across more clearly as we release the books.

I wrote the first book, FAMISHED: THE FARM, over the space of four years. FAMISHED: THE COMMONS took a little over one year. I've written quite a bit about the process of editing those.


What are you working on now?

I have a dear friend named William Dolan who paints tremendous Chicago street scenes (check him out at http://www.dolanart.com/). His motto is, "I never talk about my work. Talking about it makes me feel like I've done something about it, and as such, the work never really gets done."

I saw a lot of truth in that. Talking about the work dilutes it for me and makes it easy to pretend it's moving along faster than it is. I'm still focused on the Gentleman Ghouls series as well as some poetry and short stories, one of which I'm very excited about.


Best and worst advice you've received or heard about writing.

The worst advice is "write what you know." I hate that phrase with a passion; it lines shelves with copyists and endless memoirs of suburban alienation. I've said it before; write what you're excited to know more about.

The best advice … Steven Raichlen, one of my cooking idols, says, "Set concrete goals with realistic timetables." Creative work is still work, and if you just dream up this great big book you want to write "someday," well. Someday never comes.


Any last words?

Not last, I hope.

But I believe in you. I believe in everyone reading these words … you can do anything you want to. It might not be easy, it might not be fun; but it's possible. When you think nobody has any faith, think again. I want you all to succeed and live a life that you find worth living.

--

Read more about Ivan at his website.

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Sale!

by Jennifer 28. November 2013 18:00

HOLIDAY WEEKEND SPECIAL

November 28-December 2nd

ALL ebooks are $0.99

All domestic shipping is free with the code: BLACKFRIDAY

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